Bengali part 2

247-252

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266-273

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282-289

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290-297

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366-375

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376-384

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409-415

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416-420

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v20 1,4-18

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v20 19,20,22-28,30-32,34, v21 52, v26 34

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Bengali part 1

1-11

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12-21

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22-32

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33-47

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48-58

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59-71

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72-83,86

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87-97

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98-100,103-106,108,109

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110-114,116-120

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121-129

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130-134,136-141

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142-152

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153-162

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163-171

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130-134,136-141

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183-189

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190-199

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200-206

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207-214

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215-222

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223-230

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231-238

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239-246

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Rip Kirby

Rip Kirby is a popular comic strip featuring the adventures of the eponymous lead character, a private detective created by Alex Raymond in 1946. Displaying the talents of more than a dozen writers and illustrators, the strip had a long run, spanning five decades.

Comics historian Don Markstein noted how the character of Remington “Rip” Kirby broke away from the usual pulp detective archetype:

“Circulation rose steadily during the strip’s first few years — even tho Rip wasn’t the kind of private detective they were used to from pulp fiction. This one did more cogitating than fisticuffing, and smoked a leisurely pipe while he did it. He had a frail, balding assistant, Desmond (a former burglar), instead of a two-fisted sidekick. Instead of carrying on with an endless series of female clients, he had a steady girlfriend, Honey Dorian. If that wasn’t enough, he even wore glasses! Even Kerry Drake didn’t depart so far from the standard. If Rip was more sophisticated and urbane than the average fictional private eye, that’s okay, because he was very successful — both for himself and for the people who wrote, drew and distributed him.”

In 1956, Raymond was killed in a car crash. King Features quickly needed a replacement and found it in John Prentice.

Dickenson continued to write the series until the mid-1980s when he was forced to retire for health reasons. Prentice then took over the writing along with others. Prentice kept the strip going until his own death in 1999. The strip ended with Rip’s retirement on June 26, 1999. Prentice received the National Cartoonists Society Story Comic Strip Award for 1966, 1967 and 1986 for his work on the strip.

Over the years of publication, the strip was ghosted and assisted by many artists and writers, including Frank Bolle (who completed the last episode), Al Williamson, and Gray Morrow.

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Phil Corrigan

Secret Agent X-9 was a comic strip begun by writer Dashiell Hammett (The Maltese Falcon) and artist Alex Raymond (Flash Gordon). Syndicated by King Features, it ran from January 22, 1934 until February 10, 1996.

X-9 was a nameless agent who worked for a nameless agency. X-9 used the name “Dexter” in the first story (“It’s not my name, but it’ll do.”) and kept using it or being called by it in later stories, but acquired the name “Phil Corrigan” in the 1940s and decades later the strip was renamed Secret Agent Corrigan. The nameless agency was also briefly the FBI when the FBI was in vogue, but when the FBI became less popular, references to it were dropped and the agency was nameless again. Hammett and Raymond eventually left the strip.

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Phantom

The Phantom is a long-running American adventure comic strip, first published by Mandrake the Magician creator Lee Falk in February 1936, now primarily published internationally by Frew Publications. The main character, the Phantom, is a fictional costumed crime-fighter who operates from the fictional African country of Bangalla. The character has been adapted for television, film and video games.

The series began with a daily newspaper strip on February 17, 1936, followed by a color Sunday strip on May 28, 1939; both are still running as of 2016. In 1966, King Features stated that The Phantom was being published in 583 newspapers worldwide. At its peak, the strip was read by over 100 million people daily.

1-14

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15-22

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23-30

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31,32,34,36,39,41,43,45,47,48,49,51,54,56

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57-62,64,65

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67,69,71,73,74,76,78

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80,82,84,86,87,89,91,93-98

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100,101,103-107

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109,110,112-117

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118,119,120,122,125,126,129,130,131,133,134,135

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136,137,139,140,141,143,145,147,148,149,151,152,154,156

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157,159,160,162,165,166,168,170,171,173,174,175,178,179,181

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182,183,184,186,188,191,194,196,198,201,204

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208,208,210,211,214,220,222,225,227,229

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231,233,234,237,238,240,243,244,245,248,250,252

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254,255,256,258,260,262,263,264,266,269,271,273

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275,277,279,280,283,285,287,289,291,293,295,297

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299,301,302,303,305,307,309,311,313,315,317

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319,320,321,323,325,327,328,329,331,333,335

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336,337,339,341,342,345,346,349,350,351,353,355,357

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359,360,361,363,365,366,367,369,371

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Here is a link with issue 386 with the 2nd part of the Embers of fury.

Issue 386

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562,566,567,568,573,576,578,579,581,582

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583,586,588,591,592,594,596,600,601,603,606,608,609

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Mike Nomad

Hard-boiled Mike Nomad was only the most recent hero of the comic strip that bore his name. Almost all of its readers know Steve Roper, who shared the title, preceded him. Not so many realize Steve Roper wasn’t the original hero either — he took it over from Big Chief Wahoo, who was originally in it for the laughs, and Wahoo got it from his old traveling partner, The Great Gusto. The succession of protagonists goes all the way back to 1936, tho Mike himself was first seen 20 years later and didn’t get his name into the title until more than a dozen years after that.

Mike, whose toughness and resourcefulness could be attributed to his commando training in World War II, was the creation of William Overgard, a former assistant to Milton Caniff on Steve Canyon. Mike was slated from the first to be a star, but Overgard never succeeded in selling his creation to a syndicate. It was only through the back door that he managed to get into print at all — a back door that opened in 1954, when Overgard became the artist on the successful Steve Roper strip. Writer Allen Saunders (Mary Worth, Kerry Drake), who had created the strip in collaboration with artist Elmer Woggon (brother of Bill Woggon, creator of Katy Keene), retired in 1955, turning the writing over to his son, John. Mike was came onto the scene during June, 1956.

Mike had held a succession of low-prestige jobs. He was introduced as a truck driver Steve hired for Proof magazine, of which he was then editor. Later, he drove a cab. In 1985 Mike won a state lottery and, freed from the necessity of working for a living, became able to live on investment income. Unfortunately, his main investment was in the Hogan Security Agency. Once inextricably involved with it, he had to protect his investment by taking on some very odd and often dangerous assignments. The only thing they had in common was that readers enjoyed them.

Steve Roper was eased out of the lead position in the strip by being allowed to grow older and retire (tho he never quite disappeared). As he became less prominent, Mike moved into his place. It was in 1969 that the title of the strip was officially changed to Steve Roper & Mike Nomad. Despite his top billing, Steve hasn’t been the main star for quite some time.

In 1984, Overgard left to concentrate on Rudy, a strip about a talking chimpanzee, which he’d created all on his own. Fran Matera (Dickie Dare, Little Annie Rooney) replaced Overgard. The younger Saunders died in 2003. After that, Matera both wrote and drew the Roper & Nomad strip.

The strip started out at Publishers Syndicate (Apple Mary), but was later handled by King Features, which distributed it to about 50 papers — far from the top echelon of circulation, but enough to eke out an existence — for a time, at least. It ended on December 26, 2004.

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Mandrake

Mandrake the Magician is a syndicated newspaper comic strip, created by Lee Falk (before he created The Phantom). Mandrake began publication on June 11, 1934. Phil Davis soon took over as the strip’s illustrator, while Falk continued to script. The strip is distributed by King Features Syndicate.

Mandrake, along with the Phantom Magician in Mel Graff’s The Adventures of Patsy, are regarded by comics historians as the first superheroes of comics. Comics historian Don Markstein writes, “Some people say Mandrake the Magician, who started in 1934, was comics’ first superhero.”

Mandrake is a magician whose work is based on an unusually fast hypnotic technique. As noted in captions, when Mandrake “gestures hypnotically”, his subjects see illusions, and Mandrake has used this technique against a variety of villains including gangsters, mad scientists, extraterrestrials, and characters from other dimensions. At various times in the comic strip, Mandrake has also demonstrated other powers, including turning invisible, shapeshifting, levitation, and teleportation. His hat, cloak and wand, passed down from his father Theron, possess great magical properties which in time Mandrake learns how to use. Although Mandrake publicly works as a stage magician, he spends much of his time fighting criminals and combatting supernatural entities. Mandrake lives in Xanadu, a high-tech mansion atop a mountain in New York State. Xanadu’s features include closed circuit TV; a sectional road which divides in half; and vertical iron gates.

46,50,53,55,63,66,68,70,75,77

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81,83,88,90,92,121,127,128,132

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138,142,144,146,150,153,155,158,161,163

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749,757,758,759,769,770,777,778,787,792,801,804

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Kerry Drake

Kerry Drake is the title of a comic strip created for Publishers Syndicate (later Publishers-Hall Syndicate) by Alfred Andriola as artist and Allen Saunders as uncredited writer. It debuted on Monday, 4 October 1943, replacing Norman Marsh’s Dan Dunn, and was syndicated continuously through 1983.

According to Saunders, Dan Dunn rivaled Dick Tracy in pioneering themes and techniques of the American detective comic—until 1942 when Marsh had an argument with Publishers Syndicate and “stormed out.” The syndicate then had Saunders (as writer and the syndicate’s comics editor) and artist Andriola take over the abandoned newspaper strip and subsequently replace it in 1943 with a new detective strip, Kerry Drake.

Among Andriola’s many assistants or ghosts over the years, specifically in drawing, were artists Hy Eisman, Jerry Robinson, Fran Matera and most notably Sururi Gümen, the last of whom worked on the strip for 30 years and shared credit with Andriola from 1976 to 1983. Eisman has said he ghosted the strip from 1957 to 1960.

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